‘This Is Spinal Tap’ Sequel Coming in 2024 From Director Rob Reiner

THIS IS SPINAL TAP, Harry Shearer, Christopher Guest, Michael McKean, 1984
Everett Collection

This Is Spinal Tap is a mockumentary film co-written and directed by Rob Reiner that first debuted in 1984. It was Reiner’s feature directorial debut and starred Christopher Guest, Michael McKean, and Harry Shearer as members of the fictional band Spinal Tap. Reiner plays a documentary filmmaker named Martin “Marty” Di Bergi who films the band on tour and the entire film is meant to be a satire of rock band documentaries.

At first, the film didn’t do that well in theaters but gained a cult following in later years upon its VHS release. It has since been credited with launching the mockumentary genre, leading the way for those wild films like Borat. Almost 40 years since the original film, Reiner is set to direct and star in a sequel, scheduled for a February 2024 release.

THIS IS SPINAL TAP, Director Rob Reiner, 1984

Embassy Pictures/Everett Collection

Guest, McKean, Shearer, and Reiner will all reprise their roles in the new film, and real-life rock stars Paul McCartney, Elton John, and Garth Brooks are set to make cameos. The sequel is reportedly inspired by the Martin Scorsese concert documentary The Last Waltz, which followed The Band’s final tour performance.

THIS IS SPINAL TAP, from left: Christopher Guest, Harry Shearer, Michael McKean, R.J. Parnell, David Kaff, 1984

Embassy Pictures/Everett Collection

Reiner shared about the plot, “When it was announced that Spinal Tap would reunite for one final concert, Marty DiBergi saw this as a chance to make things right with the band who viewed ‘This Is Spinal Tap’ as a hatchet job. So he left his position as visiting adjunct teacher’s assistant at the Ed Wood School of Cinematic Arts in pursuit of film history.”

Are you excited about the upcoming sequel to This Is Spinal Tap?

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1980s Top Summer Blockbusters

July 2019

Celebrate the biggest summer movies of the ’80s, when moviegoing morphed from mere entertainment to blockbuster events.

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